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Mago and Omo National Parks

Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

Mago National Park

Located on the eastern bank of the Omo River, it is 2162 sq km in area. The abundance of wildlife in the park is equally fascinating as the Omo Park. Within dense acacia scrubs, rolling grassland and deserts, birds dart in and out and the game roams freely. unlike in the Omo Park area accessibility is very simple in this region. Found in Gamo Gofa region with the size of 2,162 square kilometer. Geographically the park is located in south-west of Ethiopia, touching east bank of Omo river. Established to protect large mamalsof the plains(Elephants, Buffaloes, Giraffes etc). Its altitude ranges from 450 to 2,528meter high on mount Mago
    
Physical features:- Most of the park lies on the rift valley floor at an altitude below 500m, and is correspondingly hot and sweaty. The highest point is Mount Mago situated in the north of the park. Temperatures here swing between 140C and 410C and rainfall, which falls from March to May and October to December, is low, being 480 millimeter on average.

Vegetation:- The park is dominated by dense Acacia woodland, which is interspersed with small areas of open grass savannah, pristine riparian forest areas around the rivers. Very dense bush makes for difficult game viewing.

Animal life:- The park was set up to conserve the large numbers of plains animals in the area, particularly buffalo, giraffe and elephant which now a days are hardly seen because of poachers. Also among the fifty-six species of mammals seen here are topi and lelwel hartebeest, as well as lion, cheetah, leopard, burchell's zebra, gerenuk, oryx and greater and lesser kudu.

Bird life:- The birds are typical of the dry grassland habitat, featuring bustards, hornbills, weavers and starlings. Kingfishers and herons can be seen around the Nile River, which provides an alternative habitat. There are 153 species, three of them endemic.

Omo National Parks    

One of the most beautiful national parks in Ethiopia, its 4068 km2 of wilderness bordered by the Omo river, is home to an amazing range of wildlife. 306 species of birds have been identified here, while large herds of Eland, some Buffalo, Elephants, Giraffe, Cheetah, Lion, Leopard, Burchell's Zebra are not uncommon.

The park is not easily accessible, as the current means of access is via Omorate and the ferry to the north bank of the river. The park HQ is 75 km from Kibish settlement. However, a new airstrip is available close to the HQ and to a pleasant campsite on the Mui River - plans are in hand for further major improvements.

Omo National Park, the largest in the country, with an area of 4,068 square kilometres. It is a vast expanse of true wilderness, adjacent to  the Omo River, which flows southwards into Lake Turkana and is one of the richest and least-visited  wildlife sanctuaries in eastern Africa. Eland, oryx, Burchell's zebra, Lelwel hartebeest, buffalo, giraffe, elephant, waterbuck, kudu, lion, leopard and cheetah roam within the park's boundaries.

The Omo Valley is virtually free of human habitation but is rich in palaeo-anthro-pological  remains. According to scientific research done in 1982 by the University of California at Berkeley, hominid remains from the Omo Valley probably date back more than four million years.

Much of Africa's volcanic activity is concentrated along the immense 5,000 kilometre crack in the earth's surface known as the Rift Valley. It is the result of two roughly parallel faults, between which, in distant geological time, the crust was weakened and the land subsided. The valley walls - daunting blue-grey ridges of  volcanic basalt and granite - rise sheer on either side to towering heights of 4,000 metres. The valley floor, 50 kilometres or more across, encompasses some of the world's last true wildernesses.

Ethiopia is often  referred to as the 'water tower' of eastern Africa because of the many rivers that pour off its high tableland, and a visit to this part of the Rift Valley, studded with lakes, volcanoes and savannah grassland, offers the visitor a true  safari experience.

Located on the eastern bank of the Omo River, it is 2162 sq km in area. The abundance of wildlife in the park is equally fascinating as the Omo Park. Within dense acacia scrubs, rolling grassland and deserts, birds dart in and out and the game roams freely. unlike in the Omo Park area accessibility is very simple in this region. Found in Gamo Gofa region with the size of 2,162 square kilometer. Geographically the park is located in south-west of Ethiopia, touching east bank of Omo river. Established to protect large mamalsof the plains(Elephants, Buffaloes, Giraffes etc). Its altitude ranges from 450 to 2,528meter high on mount Mago
    
Physical features:- Most of the park lies on the rift valley floor at an altitude below 500m, and is correspondingly hot and sweaty. The highest point is Mount Mago situated in the north of the park. Temperatures here swing between 140C and 410C and rainfall, which falls from March to May and October to December, is low, being 480 millimeter on average.

Vegetation:- The park is dominated by dense Acacia woodland, which is interspersed with small areas of open grass savannah, pristine riparian forest areas around the rivers. Very dense bush makes for difficult game viewing.

Animal life:- The park was set up to conserve the large numbers of plains animals in the area, particularly buffalo, giraffe and elephant which now a days are hardly seen because of poachers. Also among the fifty-six species of mammals seen here are topi and lelwel hartebeest, as well as lion, cheetah, leopard, burchell's zebra, gerenuk, oryx and greater and lesser kudu.

Bird life:- The birds are typical of the dry grassland habitat, featuring bustards, hornbills, weavers and starlings. Kingfishers and herons can be seen around the Nile River, which provides an alternative habitat. There are 153 species, three of them endemic.

Omo National Parks  

One of the most beautiful national parks in Ethiopia, its 4068 km2 of wilderness bordered by the Omo river, is home to an amazing range of wildlife. 306 species of birds have been identified here, while large herds of Eland, some Buffalo, Elephants, Giraffe, Cheetah, Lion, Leopard, Burchell's Zebra are not uncommon.

The park is not easily accessible, as the current means of access is via Omorate and the ferry to the north bank of the river. The park HQ is 75 km from Kibish settlement. However, a new airstrip is available close to the HQ and to a pleasant campsite on the Mui River - plans are in hand for further major improvements.

Omo National Park, the largest in the country, with an area of 4,068 square kilometres. It is a vast expanse of true wilderness, adjacent to  the Omo River, which flows southwards into Lake Turkana and is one of the richest and least-visited  wildlife sanctuaries in eastern Africa. Eland, oryx, Burchell's zebra, Lelwel hartebeest, buffalo, giraffe, elephant, waterbuck, kudu, lion, leopard and cheetah roam within the park's boundaries.
The Omo Valley is virtually free of human habitation but is rich in palaeo-anthro-pological  remains. According to scientific research done in 1982 by the University of California at Berkeley, hominid remains from the Omo Valley probably date back more than four million years.

Much of Africa's volcanic activity is concentrated along the immense 5,000 kilometre crack in the earth's surface known as the Rift Valley. It is the result of two roughly parallel faults, between which, in distant geological time, the crust was weakened and the land subsided. The valley walls - daunting blue-grey ridges of  volcanic basalt and granite - rise sheer on either side to towering heights of 4,000 metres. The valley floor, 50 kilometres or more across, encompasses some of the world's last true wildernesses.

Ethiopia is often  referred to as the 'water tower' of eastern Africa because of the many rivers that pour off its high tableland, and a visit to this part of the Rift Valley, studded with lakes, volcanoes and savannah grassland, offers the visitor a true  safari experience.

Bahir Dar

Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

Bahir Dar

Bahar Dar is a small town set on the south - eastern shore of Lake Tana where the Blue Nile is sourced, is a place those local fishermen still use papyrus boats, and just 37 km from the spectacular Tissisat Falls. Here the Blue Nile used to create "Smoking Water" an awe-inspiring sight as it plunges into the gorge below.

Nechi Sar National Park

Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

Set in the rift valley at an altitude of 1,100 to 1,650m the Nechi Sar national Park protects an untrammeled landscape of mountains and lakes as thrillingly beautiful as that of any African game reserve. The park protects not only the easterly Nechi Sar (White grass) plains for which it is named but also significant portion of lakes Abaya and Chamo, and the mountainous Egzer Dildey (Bridge of God) that divides the two lake. The habitats range from the knotted acacia scrub of Egzer dildey to the wide open grassland of the Nechisar plain, or from the open water of lakes Abaya and Chamo to the dense ground water forest that divides the lake from the town Arbaminch.

A wide variety of plains game roam freely amongst 514m2 of savannah, dry bush and groundwater forest, which are also the habitat of 188 recorded species of birds. Animals to be seen are Bushbuck, Swayne's Hartebeest, Burchell's Zebra, Grant's Gazelle, Guenther's Dik-dik, Greater Kudu, Crocodile, Anubis Baboon, Grey Duiker. Birds seen include Red-billed Hornbill, Grey Hornbil,l Fish Eagle, Kori Bustard, Abyssinian Ground Hornbill.
 
A backdrop of hills and mountains combine to make this one of the most attractive national parks in Ethiopia, and its location makes it very accessible. In the far eastern part of the park hot springs bubble to the surface.

Semien Mountain National Park

Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

The Semien mountains are one of Africa’s largest ranges studded with at least a dozen of peaks topping the 4,000m mark. These includes Ras Dashen, 4,543masl, the highest point in Ethiopia and possibly the fourth highest peak in Africa. The semien mountain national park is the only park in Ethiopia registered as world heritage site in 1979.

The Semien Mountains were formed from lava outpouring in the Miocene and Oligocene geological periods. These trap lava covered all the previous rock formation and the type of volcanic activities were like the “Hawaiian” type(found in china) and spread over a wide area covering about 15,000 square kilometer. The layers of the rocks were laid one on top of the other like the pages of a book.

Scenic Value:- As a result of the unique landscape together with the steep up slopes of the escarpment which falls down about 1KM vertically, provides a breath taking scenery which is usually referred as the most spectacular view from the world even the famous landscape, the Grand Canyon in United States of America.

The dramatic uniqueness of the Semien mountains was described by the early 20th Century. In addition outside visitors have witnessed as A place where heaven hit by his elbow. Due to the outstanding natural beautifulness of the topography, the Semien Mountain Ntional Park has high tourism potential and visitors usually come mainly to view the scenery.

Wildlife:- Three of Ethiopia’s large mammal are resident in the semiens. The Gelada baboon is the most common of these, with an estimation population of 7,000 often to be seen congregating in grazing herds of up 400 individuals. By contrast the Ethiopian wolf is now very rare in the mountains with a population of no more than 100.  The Walia Ibex is another endemic animal to be seen inside the park.

About 180 of birds species are recorded in the semien mountains. The mountains are noted for cliff nesting birds of prey, in particular  the large and powerful Lammergeyer, which can often be seen soaring above the escarpment on the north side of the park.

Trekking

Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

Ethiopia is a land of variety of distinct geographical zones and contrasts, varying as much as 120metres below sea level in the harsh salt flats of the Danakil depression, to a 4543metres peak Ras Dashen, the fourth highest peak in Africa. Several of Ethiopia's more remote areas are excellent for walking safaris, which are offered by several good tour operators in the country. Walking tours, best planned for the dry season, offer the traveler the opportunity for excellent vantage points from which to view many of Ethiopia's natural wonders, the spectacular scenery and astonishing wildlife make Ethiopia a truly superb destination for hike lovers. The cornucopia of natural beauty that blesses Ethiopia offers an astonishing variety of landscapes: Afro-Alpine highlands soaring to around 4,543 meters, deserts sprinkled with salt flats and yellow sulphur, lake lands with rare and beautiful birds, moors and mountains, the  splendor of the Great Rift Valley, white-water rivers, savannah teeming with game, giant waterfalls, dense and lush jungle  the list is endless.

Semien Mountain National Park

Simien Mountain National Park, in northern Ethiopia is a spectacular landscape in the world, where massive erosion over millions of years ago has created jagged mountain peaks, deep valleys and sharp precipices dropping some 1,500 m. The park is of global significance for biodiversity conservation because it is home to globally threatened species, including the iconic Walia ibex, a wild mountain goat found nowhere else in the world, the Gelada baboon and the Ethiopian wolf.
The Semiens are remarkable as being one of the few spots in Africa where snow regularly falls. The Mountain consist of plateau separated by valleys and rising to pinnacles. The tallest peak is Ras Dashen(4550MASL),  which the highest peak in Ethiopia as well; other notable height include mount Bohit(4430) the second highest peak in the semien mountain national park.

Trekking in Maqdela

The trek from Lake Hashengie to Magdala is a wonderful challenge for the adventurous trekker. It takes you to our final campsite, top of Maqdala Amba, which is over 3000 meters.  Magdala was a stronghold of military for the former King Tewodros II. The power of the Gondarine Empire was eventually weakened by the presence of the Oromo, as well as by the doctrinal disputes that had undermined the Church. Real power passed to regional warlords in what is called the Era of the Princes, the decades of civil war that ended in 1855 when Kasa Haylu defeated his rivals and became the emperor Tewodros II and he made his capital at Meqdela.

The siege at Magdala in 1868 and was the main reason for the journey made by General Napier. He began at the Red Sea Coast traveling about 391 miles from Kumayli, across Eritrea into Ethiopia via Lake Hashengie and up to Magdala. Negotiation between King Teodros II and the British Government failed to reach an agreement. Finally in August 1867, the cabinet granted 2 million pounds to mount an expedition, led by General Napier to rescue the British hostages held captive by King Tewodros II at Magdala. Soldiers from four regiments, the Artillery, Cavalry, Engineers and Infantry took part. Over 35,000 pack animals including camels, together with 44 elephants made the difficult journey. Emperor Tewodros II of Ethiopia committed suicide in 1868 after being defatted by the British troops. The Historical perspective adds another dimension to the trek.

Our trek begins by Lake Hashengie and covers about 150 miles, following the same route taken by General Napier. This will enable travelers to experience and enjoy the truly varied topography and landscape, truly unspoiled and rarely visited site. At Meqdela, besides its beautiful scenery, one can visit the Sebastopol Canyon, the old church and Emperor Tewodros II graveyard. It is the best one of the place for both for trekkers and for historians. For further details please contact us, one of our agent will send you more details about this package.

Bale Mountain    

Bale Mountains National Park is an area of high altitude plateau that is broken by numerous spectacular volcanic plugs and peaks, beautiful alpine lakes and rushing mountain streams that descend into deep rocky gorges on their way to the lowlands below. As you ascend into the mountains you will experience changes in the vegetation with altitude, from juniper forests to heather moorlands and alpine meadows, which at various times of year exhibit an abundance of colourful wildflowers.
Bale Mountains National Park is the largest area of Afro-Alpine habitat in the whole of the continent. It gives the visitor opportunities for unsurpassed mountain walking, horse trekking, scenic driving and the chances to view many of Ethiopia's endemic mammals, in particular the Mountain Nyala and Semien Fox, and birds, such as the Thick-billed Raven, Wattled Ibis, Blue-winged Goose, and Rouget's Rail.

Gheralta Cliff Churches

Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

Tigray, Ethiopia’s northern most region is reach in history Ethiopia, old beyond all imaginings. its culture and traditions dated back over 3000 years. Ethiopia’s north most state, Tigray contains the first outposts of the high and mountainous escarpment in which the country’s remarkable civilization was born.

In the remote wilderness of the south west Ethiopia live the Mursi & Surma. These peoples were completely forgotten by Ethiopia and the outside world at large, and they on their part had no notion of the outside world including Ethiopia until the seventies. The peoples of this savannah and mountainous land have such extensive cultural features that never cease to amaze visitors. While the women show their beauty and endurance by the ear lobes and the piercing of the lips, the men demonstrate their courage and stamina in the stick fighting ceremony.

The Dassanetch: - People of Circumcision

Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

They speak a completely different language and are actually the Cushitic speaking group of the Omo Valley. The most important ritual of the Dassanetch is the so-called dime. In theory, only a man who has had a daughter can be circumcised, although in practice, circumcision is carried out on the entire age-group. The daughter is most important in the dime ceremony. After the ceremony, which takes six weeks, the participants are upgraded to 'great men', or those that may engage in politics. The dime ritual is directly connected to the upcoming marriage of the daughter when large quantities of cattle are slaughtered for the occasion.

The Dorze Tribe: - A Rich Weaving Tradition

Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

They are one of the small segments of the great Omotic language group of southern Ethiopia. Once warriors, they now earn their living by farming and weaving. The Dorze name is synonymous with the best in woven cotton cloth and the tall-up bee-hive shaped bamboo house. There is quite a big Dorze community living and weaving on the northern part of Addis, on the way to Entoto. These peoples rarely use the administrative and police force of the city. They settle all disputes in their usual cultural way, through their elders.

The Karo: - People of Chalk Painted Bodies

Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

The Karo tribe residing along the borders of the Lower Omo River incorporates rich, cultural symbolism into their rituals by using ornate body art, intricate headdresses, and significance within their community. The most important ceremony in the life of a Karo is the Pilla, or jumping over a group of oxen. This ritual marks the passage from adolescence to adulthood. The ceremony is similar to that of the Hamar, however the Karo only have four chances to jump over the oxen without falling.
The Karo, who number only about 3,000 people, mainly live on the practice of flood retreat cultivation on the banks of the Omo River in South-western Ethiopia.

About Endless

Endless Ethiopia Tours (EETs) is established by friendly, trained and experienced experts in tourism industry, who are here to provide you with the best unbiased, personalized and knowledgeable services.

P.O.Box: 26001 code 1000
        Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

+251-938-643-685